Piroplasmosis in Humans

Piroplasmosis Infections and Babesia in Dogs
Humans cannot contract Babesia from a dog
Piroplasmosis in Humans

Piroplasmosis in Humans

More bad Piroplasmosis news comes out of Massachusetts, where, in 2011, a study revealed that the elderly are far more vulnerable to the effects of Babesia. A person can carry the parasite for many years, with symptoms arising only with advanced age or with a compromised immunity. Also, as with canines, the removal of the spleen can further compound the onset and severity of symptoms. If a human being develops Piroplasmosis symptoms, death from complications is always a possibility. In Massachusetts alone, the number of diagnosed cases of Piroplasmosis doubled in the same year this study was completed. Treatment should not be overlooked, even if test results are negative. As in the case of canine Piroplasmosis, any side effects that treatment may bring pale in comparison to what this disease can do if it is given the opportunity to advance.

There is an undeniable rise in the instances of Piroplasmosis and other tick-borne parasitic diseases like Lyme disease. Cabinet Veterinaire International is vowing to spread the word to dog owners, veterinarians, and other medical professionals about Babesia – which will, with any luck, save at least one precious life.

Cabinet Veterinaire International would be happy to continue this all-important Babesia and Piroplasmosis discussion with you. Simply contact us via email or call 022 755 55 33 at your earliest convenience.